Second Day of Tests

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Monday 6th January

My second trip to the hospital in Exeter sees me undergoing another batch of tests for the Combi-Ad trial.

My first stop is at Cardiology where I am to have an Echocardiogram to check the structure of my heart and it’s pumping capability. The technician explains it is similar to an ultrasound scan whilst pregnant. I have to totally strip off my top half, and have the sensor, with gel, placed at various positions around my heart. The three-dimensional imaging is amazing. Many screen shots are taken, measurements made, and numbers crunched. The whole process takes about half an hour, then I wait for the printout to take with me to the trials nurse back in oncology.

After a ten minute wait in oncology, I am taken into a consulting room with the senior trials nurse. She is great, very friendly and willing to listen and answer all my questions. She remarks that I have super veins, and then proceeds to take a number of vials of blood.

‘Observations’ are next: blood pressure, temperature, pulse, height and weight. Oh my, I have gained a couple of pounds in weight, and lost an inch in height!! Diet time and I need to improve my posture and do some stretching!

I am then taken into another private consulting room and have a full physical check with one of the trial doctors. (I have to remove all clothing apart from my bra and vest top!) He checks my visual response to his moving finger; he asks me to frown, screw up my eyes and blow out my cheeks; he checks the strength in my neck and shoulders; he listens to my chest and back; I have to say “aaahhhh”;  he feels my stomach; and lastly I have a rectal exam. I had been really, really dreading this particular part of the exam, but it was painless, and soon over.

My husband and I then take time out to have some lunch and a cappuccino before the final appointment of the day with my plastic surgeon. (I have to remove my trousers this time!). It is eight weeks tomorrow since my surgery. The hardish, red, black lumpy lump at the top of my leg is unsightly, but not sore. A seroma is a nasty side effect of the operation, but the surgeon is not unduly worried. He could drain the fluid using a fine needle, but that could introduce infection, and in all probability would fill up again. He is pleased with the scar healing, and will see me again in three months.

My first appointment was at 12:30pm, the last at 4:40pm, but I didn’t go in til 5pm. We drive away just after five thirty and arrive home at a quarter to eight.

Another long day, but ultimately it will be so worth it. I am due to come back on the 14th for more bloods, obs, a smear test, a check with the oncologist, and then to be given my four weeks worth of drugs. £7000 worth!!!

Things are looking positive for a much better year.

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